2021-09-13T11:24:11+00:00

Top 6 Do’s and Don’ts of Academic Writing

Top 6 Do’s and Don’ts of Academic Writing

Academic writing is clear, concise, focused, structured, and backed up by evidence. Its purpose is to aid the reader’s understanding. It has a formal tone and style, but it is not complex and does not require the use of long sentences and complicated vocabulary.

Academic writing is clear, concise, focused, structured, and backed up by evidence. Its purpose is to aid the reader’s understanding.

It has a formal tone and style, but it is not complex and does not require the use of long sentences and complicated vocabulary.

According to online BTEC assignment help, Each subject discipline will have certain writing conventions, vocabulary, and types of discourse that you will become familiar with over the course of your degree. However, there are some general characteristics of academic writing that are relevant across all disciplines.

Characteristics of Academic Writing

Academic writing is:

Planned and focused: answers the question and demonstrates an understanding of the subject.

Structured: is coherent, written in a logical order, and brings together related points and material.

Evidenced: demonstrates knowledge of the subject area, supports opinions and arguments with evidence, and is referenced accurately.

Formal in tone and style: uses appropriate language and tenses, and is clear, concise, and balanced.

Dos of Academic Writing

Formal and unbiased

Academic writing aims to convey information in an impartial way. The goal is to base arguments on the evidence under consideration, not the author’s preconceptions. All claims should be supported with relevant evidence, not just asserted.

To avoid bias, it’s important to represent the work of other researchers and the results of your own research fairly and accurately. This means clearly outlining your methodology and being honest about the limitations of your research told by the MSC assignment help service.

The formal style used in academic writing ensures that research is presented consistently across different texts so that studies can be objectively assessed and compared with other research.

Because of this, it’s important to strike the right tone with your language choices. Avoid informal language, including slang, contractions, clichés, and conversational phrases.

Clear and precise

It’s important to use clear and precise language to ensure that your reader knows exactly what you mean. This means being as specific as possible and avoiding vague language.

Specialist language or jargon is common and often necessary in academic writing, which generally targets an audience of other academics in related fields.

However, the best thesis help says that jargon should be used to make your writing more concise and accurate, not to make it more complicated. A specialist term should be used when:

It conveys information more precisely than a comparable non-specialist term.

Your reader is likely to be familiar with the term.

The term is commonly used by other researchers in your field.

The best way to familiarize yourself with the kind of jargon used in your field is to read papers by other researchers and pay attention to their language.

Focused and well-structured

An academic text is not just a collection of ideas about a topic—it needs to have a clear purpose. Start with a relevant research question or thesis statement, and use it to develop a focused argument. Only include information that is relevant to your overall purpose.

According to case study assignment help, a coherent structure is crucial to organize your ideas. Pay attention to the structure at three levels: the structure of the whole text, paragraph structure, and sentence structure described by the term paper help service.

Well-sourced

Academic writing uses sources to support its claims. Sources are other that the author analyzes or uses as evidence. Many of your sources will be written by other academics; academic writing is collaborative and builds on previous research.

It’s important to consider which sources are credible and appropriate to use in academic writing. For example, citing Wikipedia is typically discouraged. Don’t rely on websites for information; instead, use academic databases and your university library to find credible sources.

You must always cite your sources in academic writing. This means acknowledging whenever you quote or paraphrase someone else’s work by including a citation in the text and a reference list at the end.

Correct and consistent

As well as following the rules of grammar, punctuation, and citation, it’s important to consistently apply stylistic conventions regarding:

How to write numbers

Introducing abbreviations

Using verb tenses in different sections

Capitalization of terms and headings

Spelling and punctuation differences between the UK and US English

In some cases, there are several acceptable approaches that you can choose between—the most important thing is to apply the same rules consistently and to carefully proofread your text before you submit suggested by PowerPoint presentation help.

Don’ts of Academic Writing

Personal

Academic writing generally tries to avoid being too personal. Information about the author may come in at some points—for example in the acknowledgments or in a personal reflection—but for the most part, the text should focus on the research itself.

Always avoid addressing the reader directly with the second-person pronoun “you.” Use the impersonal pronoun “one” or an alternate phrasing instead for generalizations.

The use of the first-person pronoun “I” used to be similarly discouraged in academic writing, but it is increasingly accepted in many fields. If you’re unsure whether to use the first person, pay attention to conventions in your field or ask your instructor.

When you refer to yourself, it should be for good reason. You can position yourself and describe what you did during the research, but avoid arbitrarily inserting your personal thoughts and feelings.

Long-winded

It is told by the lab report help website, many students think their writing isn’t academic unless it’s over-complicated and long-winded. This isn’t a good approach, instead, aim to be as concise and direct as possible.

If a term can be cut or replaced with a more straightforward one without affecting your meaning, it should be. Avoid redundant phrasings in your text, and try replacing phrasal verbs with their one-word equivalents where possible.

Repetition is a part of academic writing, for example, summarizing earlier information in the conclusion but it’s important to avoid unnecessary repetition. Make sure that none of your sentences are repeating a point you’ve already made in different words.

Emotive and grandiose

An academic text is not the same thing as a literary, journalistic, or marketing text. Though you’re still trying to be persuasive, a lot of techniques from these styles are not appropriate in an academic context. Specifically, you should avoid appeals to emotion and inflated claims.

Though you may be writing about a topic that’s sensitive or important to you, the point of academic writing is to clearly communicate ideas, information, and arguments, not to inspire an emotional response. Moreover, the book report help says that avoid using emotive or subjective language.

Students are sometimes tempted to make the case for their topic with exaggerated, unsupported claims and flowery language. Stick to specific, grounded arguments that you can support with evidence, and don’t overstate your point.

Conclusion

Academic writing is a formal style of writing used in universities and scholarly publications. You’ll encounter it in journal articles and books on academic topics, and you’ll be expected to write your essays, research papers, and dissertation in an academic style.

Academic writing follows the same writing process as other types of texts, but it has specific conventions in terms of content, structure, and style.


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